New Measures To Combat Feral Chickens

August 15, 2012

[Updated with video] The Department of Conservation Services will be taking new measures to combat the growing infestation of feral chickens, Public Works Minister Michael Weeks said this morning [Aug 15].

It is estimated that there are over 30,000 chickens roaming the island and these numbers continue to grow.

Started in August 2011 by the Department of Conservation Services, one programme has culled over 3,500 feral chickens using a variety of traps, nets, and traditional methods

Minister Weeks said: “The problem of feral chickens may seem trivial to some, however, to the many residents who are affected they are a very real nuisance.

“Concerns range from crowing roosters causing sleepless nights and the spreading of trash, to significant economic crop and garden damage, attacks on park users and hotel guests, destruction of threatened habitats in our nature reserves – as well as potential disease vectors for Salmonella and Bird Flu that could impact public human health.

“Bermuda’s feral chicken situation is not a new one. We have been experiencing it for several decades. It is believed that this problem was significantly exacerbated as a result of Hurricane Emily in 1987 when many domestic chicken coops were destroyed, thus “seeding” small populations of feral chickens throughout the island.

“Since then our feral chicken population has grown significantly and they can now be found in parks, nature reserves, golf courses, open fields, hotels, waste treatment areas, housing complexes and residential areas. Basically everywhere!”

Minister Weeks said an Integrated Pest Management Plan has been developed to control the proliferation of feral chickens with an aim to eradicate the problem by the year 2015.

Key components of the plan include: creation of an inter-Ministerial working group; improved legislation to stop public feeding and release of chickens into the wild; use of a variety of proven techniques best suited to each situation that are efficient and humane; and the creation of a public relation and awareness campaign.

The Minister also noted that it is an offense under the Summary of Offenses Act to allow your poultry to wander off your property, and people who do so are liable for a $2,880 fine.

Minister Weeks full statement follows below:

Good morning,

Thank you all for coming today.

We are here at Spittal Pond Nature Reserve to formally recognize an issue that the island has been experiencing for many years with regards to a growing infestation of feral chickens…..and also to announce new measures the Department of Conservation Services is taking to effectively control this population.

Feral chickens are domesticated chickens that have been deliberately released or left to run wild which end up feeding and reproduce freely. In contrast, domesticated chickens, while the same species, are responsibly managed by both home owners and farmers – a practice that is encouraged by the Government.

The problem of feral chickens may seem trivial to some, however, to the many residents who are affected they are a very real nuisance. Concerns range from crowing roosters causing sleepless nights and the spreading of trash, to significant economic crop and garden damage, attacks on park users and hotel guests, destruction of threatened habitats in our nature reserves – as well as potential disease vectors for Salmonella and Bird Flu that could impact public human health.

Bermuda’s feral chicken situation is not a new one. We have been experiencing it for several decades. It is believed that this problem was significantly exacerbated as a result of Hurricane Emily in 1987 when many domestic chicken coops were destroyed, thus “seeding” small populations of feral chickens throughout the island.

Since then our feral chicken population has grown significantly and they can now be found in parks, nature reserves, golf courses, open fields, hotels, waste treatment areas, housing complexes and residential areas. Basically everywhere!

To give you an idea of the extent of the infestation – it is estimated that there are over 30,000 chickens roaming throughout the island and these numbers continue to grow exponentially. To illustrate, a hen can produce a clutch of eggs every 20 weeks. A typical clutch size is eight to 15 chicks and most of these survive due to Bermuda’s “generous” climate. In turn, these same chicks become fertile after 20 weeks. As a result one single hen can lead to the creation of between 64 and 198 chicks per year.

This helps to explain why an area, once cleared of chickens, seems to “magically” appear full of them several months later. Unfortunately Government officers have noticed that some inconsiderate residents have not been helping with this feral chicken issue by dumping unwanted pets into areas as well as regularly feeding them.

Feral chickens do not respect property boundaries and are constantly moving from area to area. I say this to illustrate the point that their control is not just the concern of one Government Ministry but several including the Ministries of Public Works, Environment, Planning and Infrastructure Strategy and Health.

Government Departments have tried since the 1980s to control this issue by introducing a number of pilot programs, with mixed success. The most recent program is currently being run by the Department of Conservation Services. Started in August 2011, this programme has culled over 3,500 feral chickens using a variety of traps, nets, and traditional methods. Drawing on the success of this program an Integrated Pest Management Plan has been developed to control the proliferation of feral chickens with an aim to eradicate the problem by the year 2015.

Key components of the plan include:

1. The creation of an inter-Ministerial working group which combines existing resources and coordinates the efforts of all government organizations that are mandated to control this problem;

2. Improved legislation to stop public feeding and release of chickens into the wild;

3. The use of a variety of proven techniques best suited to each situation that are efficient and humane;

4. And, finally, the creation of a public relation and awareness campaign which will seek to notify the public of areas under management and also provide information on proper care and management of domestic chickens. This information will be posted on the Conservation website at www.conservation.bm

You may ask, “Why can’t we simply trap the feral chickens, test them for disease and parasites, and place them in a Government or privately operated chicken or egg-farm?” To this I can advise that our technical officers have considered a number of options with respect to harnessing this as a potential industry.

The idea of developing a chicken farm, for example, was not found to be cost effective and thought of as unfair competition to existing business. Additionally, a “seed” population of perhaps 500 chickens, made up of only the best “hen layers” and a small population of roosters would be needed to start any new farm. However, the majority of feral birds would not be suitable for breeding or egg laying. Furthermore, hens only have a relatively short laying life. This would leave a significant portion of feral chickens either unproductive or unsellable.

Similarly, our technical officers estimate there are a huge number of roosters (approx. 50% or 15,000) which would not have any use. As a result, there would be no incentive to trap the remaining large population, estimated around the 29,500 of feral chickens, freely roaming the island. In essence, to capture and test 30,000 feral chickens for consumption would simply be unrealistic and cost prohibitive.

Another idea was that of selling the feathers on the international market for use in plastics, in paper pulp or textiles. To this I have to advise we keep in mind that there is nothing special about our birds either in meat, pedigree or organic. There would be little that makes them stand out from the huge supply already in existence in the U.S. Further, export of feathers would most likely not be commercially viable given the high cost to clean, sort and bag – as well as high fuel costs to export. The export of eggs would face similar problems.

To that end, we believe that the Integrated Pest Management Plan I have just outlined is the best way forward.

However, I need to stress that in order to be successful we must have the assistance of the public.

Therefore I would urge residents to please report any infestations. This can be done on line by going to the Department of Conservation Services’ website www.conservation.bm and fill out and send in the pest control request form.

Additionally, please responsibly coop your domestic chickens. We ask that they be housed in a safe structure and not left to roam off your property. Please be aware that it is an offense under the Summary of Offenses Act to allow your poultry to wander off your property – liable for a $2,880 fine.

Also, do not dump or release unwanted chickens. Please call the Department of Conservation Services at 293-2727 for assistance.

And, finally, please do not feed feral chickens in public areas.

I will now take any questions you might have.

Thank you.

-

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Comments (64)

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  1. Cedar Beams (Original) says:

    You know things can't be that bad in Bermuda or people would catch them for dinner. Problem solved, and family fed in one go!

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  2. Yup, I said it says:

    See what happens when you get rid of the foreigners??

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  3. Observer says:

    Catch all of them and sell them to KFC!!

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  4. Eyes Wide Open says:

    KFC needs to get with it and start collecting chickens! Or..we could have a big island-wide BBQ chicken party :D

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  5. Diesel says:

    My dog always wants to attack those birds. It's the highlight of her day. Would I be performing a helpful public service if I let her at 'em?

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  6. AND THE CATS TOO says:

    how bout combat on the stray cats i see thousands around the island too. chicken and cat lou mein anyone one

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    • Chicken Eater says:

      The cats can be spayed/nuetured and released, then they won't reproduced. There is not a similar option for chickens.

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    • Politely Pompous says:

      You can't compare a cat to a chicken. The cat problem could be solved if owners weren't so darned irresponsible. It's not their fault irresponsible humans don't spay/neuter their pets. I've even known of people who move and leave their cat behind to fend for itself. That is so cruel to me...would you leave your kid behind to fend for themself as well?

      At least feral cats serve a purpose and keep the rat population in check...plus the Feline Assoc. does a lot to trap, spay/neuter them and release them. I don't find the comment about eating cats the least bit funny.

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  7. Serious Though says:

    there are enough wild cats to take care of this!!

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  8. Watching On says:

    I just want to know where I can find the eggs?

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    • Serious Though says:

      let me know too!

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    • Here fishy fishy says:

      Floating above de ground?? Or perhaps in a nest on the ground

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  9. Oh yeah says:

    Offer people $15 per chicken and you'll have more caught chickens than you know what to do with!

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  10. SmallFish says:

    About Time!!! Looking forward to a deep rested sleep but I hope it's before 2015.

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    • pepper says:

      Smallfish, all this lot talk about is what they are going to do !!!!! all you here from them is down the road this will be the plan or we are looking to the conerns of our citizens.... but nothing is being done.. as a famous gentleman said " HOW LONG MUST WE WAIT "
      Bermudians you must be concerned about all of the business's that are closing this is just the start of what is to come....but in a few days or so you will be shocked who are also calling it quits.....as our premier says we must "stand tall " what a joke...

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  11. cheryl says:

    i can relate.. had a mother chicken come into my yard with 16 babies..she stayed 2 days and left, with out them, they have been with me 3 months now..the the roosters i had destroyed, kept 4 hens and the rest friends took..
    why cant the chickens caught that are healthy be taken to the prison, some kept for their eggs and some kept for meat for the prisoners. 365 ways to cook chicken you know>.
    can save the general public a little money on their taxes...

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    • Politely Pompous says:

      Yeah, I'll bet most of those chickens are way more healthy than any we buy in the supermarket that are pumped full of hormones, antibiotics and god knows what else. I'm sure they're perfectly safe to eat.

      I wonder if there's an option of exporting them to a country in need? I'm sure there's got to be someone who'd be happy to have them for food and eggs...

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      • cheryl says:

        if people knew what exactly was pumped into those store bought chickens they wouldnt eat them.. and that is a fact as i know someone who raises them for tyson in NC... steroids.. they come in as babies and in 6 weeks they are adults and ready for the table..

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        • Mayan says:

          @Cheryl: I believe it. I once saw a program about how they pump chickens full of steroids/hormones to advance their age-it's like giving a human baby drugs to speed it through from babyhood to adulthood-bypassing puberty-in like just a few years . They pump chickens full of steroids turning them into the chicken equivalent of the Incredible Hulk so we get nice big chicken breasts and stuff but it's not natural.

          Then we eat all that stuff, thus eating what the chicken, cow, lamb etc. have been exposed to. Then we wonder why we have antibiotic resistant diseases and the like out there-due to the antibiotics we're inadvertently taking that we don't need. Also, they think that's part of the reason kids are going through puberty earlier-due to the hormones they're getting second-hand from meat.

          I won't even get into how many of the chickens, cows, etc. are sick and diseased before they kill them for food. That's why I very rarely eat meat.

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  12. Serious Though says:

    30,000 chickens

    do the math:

    10,000 egg producing chicken per day, 70,000 eggs over 6,000 trays of eggs, WHERE ARE THESE CHICKENS!!! i am not buy eggs no more!!

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    • Ride says:

      @Serious Though

      I agree that there should be a program that condones capture and animal husbanding for eggs and meat. This is preferred rather than a wasteful solution of culling or an environmentally hazardous solution of poisoning.

      It could be two fold. One part animal husbandry education on keeping the animals for eggs and humanely slaughtering the animal and dressing the carcass for meat. Of course some testing of the chicken before it is used for either to ensure it is safe. Although I gather they are much safer than the steroid and antibiotic injected, light and space deprived carrion we normally purchase at our grocer.

      The other part could be a bounty for live feral chickens. I say live as this will insure they are correctly euthanised. Some measures would have to be taken to ensure people do not raid persons hen houses of chickens for the bounty.

      I believe there are a lot of individuals and families that would husband or consume these chickens if they knew how. The result of eggs and meat for more effort than a trip to the grocer's but, I expect, less cost.

      Ride

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    • Watching On says:

      Exactly why I asked about the eggs...these eggs can be sold for a small fortune. I understand the eggs are delicious when cooked.

      Come on someone, name the places where they are plenty chickens, time for me to go egg hunting. Yummy

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    • cheryl says:

      can u imagine paying $1.50 or some reasonable price for local eggs instead of $3 something.. put the local dealer right out of business..

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  13. Serious Though says:

    and right now, Bermuda Free Range chicken sound Delicious

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  14. Serious Though says:

    just like eat lion fish campaign we need eat Bermuda chicken campaign, it will take 2 months instead of 3 years, $100,000 plus man power

    i am just saying !

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  15. Making sense... says:

    About 10 years ago I noticed that not only was the general public was apathetic about feral chickens, they were also apathetic to the burgeoning issue of feral children aka misbehaving teens. Now the chickens have all come to roost. Both of them are public menaces. When Bermuda gets tough with the feral chickens, they can also take a stand against feral children. Cluck cluck cluck

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    • mary smith says:

      right on the spot..there are too many feral children running wild,cusing,abusing,stealing from ppl..So what's with that???..what is the remedy for this urgent problem..at least the chickens are not on our social financial assistance programm..which btw is the highest cost for the entire island.

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  16. Joonya says:

    I remember I was haffhott once trying to chase one of those.
    Them bastids are quick!

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    • Come Correct says:

      Should have used and electric scooter, just don't get caught by de man...

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    • Politely Pompous says:

      I recently saw a chicken strolling up a residential road, stop in his tracks, then come flying back down the road with a white guy in a suit chasing it with his hands outstretched like he was going to strangle it. I assume the chicken kept going on the guy's property and maybe messing up his garden or something.

      The chicken was running so fast-I couldn't believe it. Chickens are intelligent so I assume he recognized the guy who had probably tried to catch him before. The chicken was like 'Feet don't fail me now!' and the guy was all red with anger just determined to wring that chicken's neck...you'd think he caught the chicken in bed with his wife or something.

      The whole scene was so unexpected...My husband and I were in our car dying laughing...

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      • Politely Pompous says:

        To clarify-it was a rooster, not a chicken...

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      • Lady says:

        Oh my goodness........what a hilarious story!!! Almost spit my tea that time!! Thank you for the gut wrenching laugh.

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  17. island girl says:

    That would keep Oscar, the alligator at BAMZ, fed for years to come!

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  18. Mar says:

    Oh for crying out loud! Leave the chickens alone! Isn't there more pressing matters out there to deal with. Shake My Head.

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    • andre says:

      You have not had one hit you in the head at 20MPH have you!

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  19. it only hurts when I breath says:

    How about NEW MEASURES TO COMBAT FERAL POLITICIANS???

    There are so many in this lame government that it would be doing a great service to the Island, and not to say our economy, to get rid of these at the same time!!

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  20. ABM says:

    What about the feral cats?! Their numbers must far outway that of the chickens.

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  21. LOLA says:

    I think this would be a could produce business in the making, if we have all these chickens why isnt there a poultry factory in the making hence more jobs. They can breed as much healthy chickens they want in a confined area, chicken at marketplace wouldnt cause so much nor the eggs. Definitely help our economy a little.

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  22. Expat who is leaving says:

    Comedy. The country is bankrupt, the tax base is shrinking, companies are leaving, local business is closing, crime is growing, unemployment is increasing...and the chickens are procreating at a rate that would make Dame Lois proud!

    Good thing our ministers are focused on the real issues, what a hilarious PR event. is this not why we have a zillion public servants to handle operational issues like this?

    Is there anything that is going right here anymore?

    Seriously, hire one decent hunter, pay him $5 per chicken, problem solved in 3 months.

    The PLP can't even organize a chicken cull!!!!

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  23. Chad Sorbet says:

    At last. I live in Cobbs Hill Road and the proliferation of chickens in this area is terrible. Some Filipinos gentlemen have started to catch them.

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  24. Precious says:

    I say leave the chickens alone and train them to combat the growing infestation of foolish politicians!

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  25. Tough Chickens says:

    There is someone who removes feral chickens on the island but low and behold the government didn't want to pay. Now it's a problem. As usual, the lack of foresight has produced yet another big problem. There aren't any chickens keeping me up at night. One call to the 'chicken man' and they are gone. And I also know that some of the chickens caught have actually fed the alligator. Perhaps the government should hire an overpaid consultant to guide them through this issue and then hire an overseas firm to remove them. Surely, if history is to be any lesson, that is the correct course of action. SMH.

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    • Watching On says:

      Can someone please let us know how to contact this Chicken Man...I am sure he also know where the eggs are. I need me some fresh eggs

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  26. Country Gal says:

    It could be a small business for the right person.
    Collect the chickens, humanely euthanize and make yummy cat food for all the feral cats.

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    • Tough Chickens says:

      It is a small business for someone. It has been for years now. I'm sure he is not making cat food out of the chickens though.

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  27. Triangle Drifter says:

    Wonderful to see the PLP finally dealing with a really important issue. Who cares about that $2b debt, ferries that don't run, millions wasted on apartments nobody wants, the Exodus of IB, the emigration of Bermudians. None of these are important to the PLP but feral chickens are.

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    • cockroach politicians says:

      they have done anything for feral youths..who running amok on Bermuda..except build a hotel prisoner for them..even supplying their jocks...shame and more shame to the plp..if anybody needs to go is the plp

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  28. Moonbeam says:

    about time ! -- talk about shutting the barn door after the horse has bolted !!!

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  29. cheryl says:

    and a follow up to my recent post, looked out my window this morning a roaster, 2 hens and 10 more babies in my yard....here we go again....

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    • Mayan says:

      I think people are willing to kill the chickens but hesitate to kill the chicks because they're cute...and it seems so callous to kill a baby of any species (except sheep!). Therefore, people just leave the chicks alone but they don't stay chicks forever.

      I'm guilty as well. I wouldn't want to kill a poor, helpless baby chick. My kids once came home with a baby chick they found all alone. I was like-what am I going to do with this thing? So we went back to the general area they found it, where there are a bunch of chickens. I looked for the first mother chicken I saw, sneaked up and released the chick right next to her babies.

      I know it wasn't his mother but he went along with her anyway. She must have wondered what happened when she turned around and had five babies instead of four. Poor thing probably had to go on benefits after that...

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  30. Erica says:

    Just do your jobs. We don't need press conferences to announce that what a Dept should be doing will get done! Electioneering at its finest. My friend has been assisting with this problem for years but nobody wants to pay him. It's a nominal fee but he has to pay for his gas and time spent catching.

    I'm more concerned of the pigeon problem. They actually can make us sick from pooping on our roofs.

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  31. LOL (original TM*) says:

    Leave my World War 3 food. We'll need them sooner if things keep going the way their going.

    LOL

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  32. eyeinthesky says:

    30,000 who are these people that estimated this number. Can't be that much on the island we would have them coming out of the woodwork! SMH comon Minister Weeks! 30,000? I know its election year but now we are embellishing the chix count!

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  33. Libby Cook-Toppan says:

    I am so sick of hearing about culling the chickens! Tourists LOVE them (I've often seen tourists on the sides of the roads snapping pics of hens and chicks). They offer natural pesticide and organic fertilizer for the roadsides...have you ever stopped to watch them eating bugs, carefully scratching through the undergrowth? Why not set up a chicken farm at the prisons for feeding the needy with eggs and meat? Don't even begin to tell me their eggs are no good...they are no different than the ones you buy at the stores, just slightly smaller and much fresher! They live a very hard life, killed by dogs and cats, ill treated by people and yet they are one of the most beautiful birds. Have you ever taken a moment to look at how beautiful their feathers are? I've witnessed children being allowed to chase violently after chickens with their parents laughing and urging them on...disgusting! Chickens are one of the most maligned creatures and yet they are so compassionate and intelligent. Did you know that a mother hen talks to her chicks even while in their eggs? That a chicken can recognize more than 200 different faces? That a mother hen will protect her chicks with her life? In their natural environment chickens are fastidiously clean and preen their feathers every day? A rooster, when he finds something good to eat will call his flock to eat before himself...seriously look it up (http://www.think-differently-about-sheep.com/Chicken-facts.htm)...Chickens make wonderful pets too...I had chickens as a child and we did the same for our son, who adores his chickens (one even behaved like a parrot and rode around on his shoulder). We have a farmed area on our property and its been there for decades and we have NEVER had any problems with the chickens eating the produce...if anything they provide the most effective pesticide...as mentioned before. What is wrong with people here??? People think its ok to chain up dogs in the heat and keep them in tiny cages....cats are discarded like old handbags...Heaven help us if a war was to break out and our food imports were interrupted...bet your bottom dollar people would be out there fighting over those chickens. Show some compassion Bermuda and leave the chickens alone! We have far more pressing issues at hand than this!

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    • cockroach politicians says:

      U'r special for giving your voice to the voiceless..it is shameless and disgusting that the minister wants to eradicate these endearing birds..ty for educa.us..

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  34. tenisha.. says:

    how about feral youths? who are allow to sell drugs in every corner,commit murder,steal,rape,defeacate in parks,postoffice,public places,run amok with their loud noices on their bike,,run amok with their loud noices on their run amok with their loud noices on theirmaking all the rest of Bermuda lock in for fear of feral youths.....At least the chickens contribute as law abiding,an attraction to the tourists,their guano droppings help fertilise the soil,artist use as interesting subjects to paint,many tourist products dipict the brave bird on porcelain,t.shirts,mugs,bags ect.The lowly chicken has many pluses and should STAY as part of the Bermuda scene..Minister you are dumb and conceited with your dumb and dumber ideas..

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  35. G.somers says:

    Just how they eradicate the cohows,skinks,longtails and now the chickens.. they are no menace but the hostile drug dealers are DANGEROUS TO THE EXISTENCE OF BERMUDA.The plp got nobody to put blame..tired use the race card so now they after the defenceless birds without voices to eradicate..plp should go...they have done more damage to Bermuda than a 30,000 chickens..bye plp ...and leave our chickens alone...

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  36. cockroach politicians says:

    The chickens have multifacet uses..they CONTROL our major bug problem..the cockroaches..their dropping is good source of fertiliser..now what have the plp done for Bermuda lately or ever?

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  37. blockade runner says:

    chickens are the foundation of our civilization, 6000 years ago a vietnamese hunter put some junglefowl in his hut and didnt have to chase pigs anymore. chickens are the cheapest meat available in the shop. the chicken is by far the biggest flock of birds on earth and there are over 32 billion right now.our bermudian civilization would collapse without chickens, we need them much more than they need us. the government doesnt have 3 years without chickens

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  38. blockade runner says:

    most of those chickens are game birds and probably only lay 30 or so eggs a year, mostly in the spring when the land has the most food.

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