BTA: Officials Explore Superyacht Opportunities

April 18, 2018 | 22 Comments

Officials who put on superyacht racing during the 35th America’s Cup last year are back in Bermuda this week to explore new superyacht opportunities on the island.

“The people who put on the Superyacht Regatta and the J Class Regatta during the America’s Cup have been looking for the right opportunity to come back to Bermuda almost since the moment they left,” said Bermuda Tourism Authority Chief Product & Experiences Development Officer Pat Phillip-Fairn.

“It’s great to have them back out here this week re-engaging with stakeholders and learning about Bermuda’s strategy as it relates to superyacht tourism. If there’s a partnership with Boat International and the J Class Association that makes sense for Bermuda, we could see superyachts dotting our harbours and marinas once again.”

ACEA photo of superyachts at the America’s Cup Village in 2017

SY Race Village Bermuda April 2018

The BTA said, “Earlier this month, the Bermuda Tourism Authority and the Government of Bermuda made a public presentation on the planned way forward for a superyacht tourism industry in Bermuda, which includes proposed legislative changes to make the island more competitive when compared to other jurisdictions.

“Since last summer, there has been extensive community engagement on the subject and dialogue with superyacht captains who visited for the America’s Cup.

A look at the America’s Cup Superyacht Regatta in 2017

“One-hundred superyachts [vessels >30 meters] visited Bermuda during the 35th America’s Cup [May 26 to June 30, 2017].

“Of that amount, there were eight J-Class boats that travelled to Bermuda, a remarkable number given there are only ten of them in the world. J-Class is the majestic class of sailboat that raced in the America’s Cup back in the 1930s and 40s.

“According to a PwC economic report on the America’s Cup, superyachts and other visiting vessels infused more than $14 million into the local economy.”

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Comments (22)

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  1. facts of the rock says:

    waiting to see the plp try to take credit for this!

  2. Joe Bloggs says:

    We don’t want their kind in Bermuda. Don’t take my word for it, ask Col. Burch.

    • Micro says:

      Most definitely. Can’t have any of the local businesses benefiting; rigging, upholstery, mechanical, electrical, plumber, retail, catering, transport, cleaning, painting, carpenters, entertainers, wholesalers, I’m sure I’m missing many others.

      • Apollo Creed says:

        Wishful thinking. All of these vessels – no more than the cruise ship in the background of the photo – will have at least one onboard engineer to deal with maintenance. Entertainment, I doubt it. Local chefs, forget it. The food and booze wholesalers might make out OK, though a lot of that stuff is normally on board – think floating wine cellar.

        It is worth noting that the Cruise Ship industry loads up mostly entirely ready made so called luxury meals to last an entire cruise – there is very little real cooking on board, mainly reheating. The main supplier is a company called Apollo Foods who operate this service globally.

    • facts of the rock says:

      wouldn’t ask him for nothing

  3. wahoo says:

    Hard to argue with pursuing this but I am sure someone I know will try.

  4. WSP says:

    Thankyou again OBA.The gift that keeps.on giving

  5. bosun rumbum pink panther says:

    get some corporate and put up a large prize for a massive J boats only series and likewise for the “mega’ sailing yachts, take some of the steam from new zealand sails in hosting a prestigious event. possibly every 2 or 3 years An event that could rival the americas cup even. true sailing was watching the J’s sail and they are gradually building or re constructing a few more.

    • wahoo says:

      J Class was beautiful to watch but if the Kiwis don’t want the foiling boats anymore why can’t Bermuda acquire them and we keep the format as some kind of invitational every other year? It was an awesome spectator friendly event that would likely get good world coverage.

      • Athena says:

        Foiling is the speed racing of sailing and has great appeal for those who are not even sailors.

        Would love to see us be able to develop this as an invitational. Also, with an ecology and charitable factor mixed in.

        Grand Prix Racing on the water!

      • Garbage says:

        World coverage? By who? Do you know what it costs to reach a “world” audience?

        I have been in marketing and advertising for over 30 years and it amazes me when people throw down ideas that should attract “world this and world that”. 100% rubbish!

        Bermuda needs to speculate to accumulate. It’s as simple as that!

        B. Redford

        • Wahoo says:

          Oh okay thanks for saying so. You obviously have vast experience we will let you know when we need some expert marketing advice.

  6. puzzled says:

    Memories

  7. Alexander says:

    Build it, and they will come. If their requirements are affordable, do it! One has to deposit something before one can achieve a return on investment.

  8. Martin says:

    Sailing will be the only tourism saving grace for 2018 we are slow all round and in recession the OBA triathlon and Newport race and a few others a bit off the carnival and tourism is over so save ur money folks lean days coming up

  9. PANGAEA says:

    BERMUDA FIRST.

    We have got the Bermuda fitted dinghy and we can build them, all you need is a 48 ” tall cup.

    What more could you want with only 3 rules ?

    Speed is not every thing! or is it ?

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