Red Hind Aggregation Areas Open For Fishing

August 15, 2019 | 2 Comments

The Red Hind aggregation areas within the seasonally protected areas will be open to fishing from today [Aug 15].

A Government spokesperson said, “The Ministry of Home Affairs wishes to advise the public that the Red Hind aggregation areas within the seasonally protected areas will be open to fishing from today [15 August, 2019].

“However, it should be noted that the extended closure areas around important Black Grouper aggregations will remain closed to fishing until 1 December, 2019.

“The exact boundaries of the seasonally protected areas and extended closure areas are shown in the two accompanying maps below, which also include the GPS co-ordinates for the four corners of each area.

Fisheries Seasonally Protected Areas Bermuda Aug 2019

“The catch limit of ten Red Hinds per 24-hour period from 1 May to 31 August remains in place for commercial fishermen, and recreational fishers have a year-round catch limit of ten Red Hinds per 24-hour period.

“The fishing public is also reminded that there is a year-round catch limit of one Black Grouper per boat, or per person fishing from shore, within a 24-hour period for all fishers.

Fisheries Seasonally Protected Areas Bermuda Aug 2019 (2)

“The Ministry urges the public to familiarize themselves with the seasonally protected areas and extended closure areas, and to abide by the Fisheries Regulations in order to help conserve our Red Hind and Black Grouper populations.

“For more information contact the Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Marine Resources Section at 293-5600 or fisheries@gov.bm”

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Comments (2)

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  1. Yummy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  2. Daniel says:

    Are these fishing regulations really being followed? How are they being enforced? Thanks to social media we have seen what really goes on in Bermuda waters – illegal fishing in grouper spawning grounds, and overfishing of juvenile sharks. There needs to be more accountability with commercial and recreational fishermen and more transparency about where our local fish come from. Recent studies show our most popular fish such as grouper in decline. You see more coneys being sold because there are less of the good stuff being caught. Coneys used to be only caught for bait! We shouldn’t be cheated like this…

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