No Bermuda Day Parade, Show To Be Held

March 25, 2021 | 15 Comments

“We will not be able to host our typical Bermuda Day Parade,” Minister of Youth, Culture and Sport Dr Ernest Peets said, adding that instead there will be a ‘Covid-safe Bermuda Day Show’ on May 28th which will be broadcast live, with some in-person tickets reserved for Bermuda’s immunized essential workers, and the theme for this year is ‘Bermudian Resilience.’

Speaking today [March 25] in the Senate, the Minister said, “Bermuda had a sobering anniversary last week, as March 18th marked the one-year anniversary of the first Covid-19 case in Bermuda. A year later, we are not yet out of the woods as we continue to grapple with the impacts of this virus.

“In the lead-up to Heritage Month, it’s worth reminding my fellow citizens that agility – the ability to note the tides and trends, and then to quickly adjust and change course accordingly – is not just a Bermudian talent; it’s our birthright,” the Minister said. “It is for this reason that the theme for Bermuda Day and Heritage Month this year is, appropriately ‘Bermudian Resilience.’

Bermudian Resilience Gombeys Bernews thumb

“It will come as no surprise in the midst of a pandemic that we will not be able to host our typical Bermuda Day Parade. Instead, the Department of Culture is organising a covid-safe Bermuda Day Show, to be held at the National Stadium on May 28th. The show will feature some of what we all love best on Bermuda Day including dance troupes, vibrant costumes and Gombeys.

“There will be a limited number of tickets available to view the show in person, but it will be broadcast live to the general public and recorded for viewing later.

“And as a way of acknowledging the extraordinary hard work and commitment of our frontline essential workers over the past year, the in-person tickets will be reserved for Bermuda’s immunized workforce who put their lives on the line during the roughest part of the pandemic: healthcare workers, the Police, Bermuda Regiment soldiers, grocery store workers, gas station attendants, as well as other frontline workers who have consistently carried out the labour necessary for our country to stay operational.

“This is a small gesture that we can offer as a ‘thank you’ for their dedication and their Bermudian resilience.”

The Minister’s full statement follows below:

Madam President, Bermuda had a sobering anniversary last week, as March 18th marked the one-year anniversary of the first Covid-19 case in Bermuda. A year later, we are not yet out of the woods as we continue to grapple with the impacts of this virus. However Madam President, human beings are nothing if not adaptable; and in the lead-up to Heritage Month, it’s worth reminding my fellow citizens that agility – the ability to note the tides and trends, and then to quickly adjust and change course accordingly – is not just a Bermudian talent; it’s our birthright.

Madam President, this national characteristic is embedded deeply in our history as Bermudians; and beyond the historical lessons that we’ve been taught in school and that we’ve learned from our own reading, most Bermudians will have also learned the lessons of agility, nimbleness, and inner strength from our families.

Listening to the stories of our parents and grandparents who came before us, and learning from the example they’ve set of how to persevere in the face of challenges, is part of our upbringing. And Madam President, although the specific circumstances of this past year of pandemic were unique, the application of these lessons is an essential ingredient in seeing us through this crisis to the other side.

Madam President, it is for this reason that the theme for Bermuda Day and Heritage Month this year is, appropriately, “Bermudian Resilience”. Resilience is at the heart of how we have managed to withstand the difficulties of this pandemic as a people, and how we will navigate the challenges to come.

Madam President, last year’s Bermuda Day and Heritage Month was one like no other; we had just emerged from shelter-in- place, and there was still much that was unknown about the Covid-19 virus. Madam President, you may recall that in lieu of our traditional Bermuda Day Parade, we instead worked with Bermemes to produce an entirely virtual experience, intended to lift the spirits of our community despite the physical distancing requirements that were in place for our safety.

Since that time, the Department of Culture has exerted and exemplified this spirit of resilience and agility. At the beginning of the pandemic, the Department quickly changed their operational model in order to produce a plethora of excellent virtual and digital content. Once more was known about the virus, the Department pivoted to the current hybrid model of delivery that illustrates how we can still gather, albeit in reduced numbers, in ways that are quite safe and minimise the risk of disease transmission.

Madam President, with this in mind, I would like to share this year’s plans for Bermuda Day and Heritage Month, where we have once again re-imagined the celebrations so that they can work in alignment with our current circumstances.

Madam President, it will come as no surprise in the midst of a pandemic that we will not be able to host our typical Bermuda Day Parade. Instead, the Department of Culture is organising a Covid-safe Bermuda Day Show, to be held at the National Stadium on May 28th. The show will feature some of what we all love best on Bermuda Day including dance troupes, vibrant costumes and Gombeys.

Sadly, we will once again miss out this year on the opportunity to tell our neighbours “don’t take my spot”; and of course, I am sure that a sizeable part of the population will truly be sorry not to experience the traditional parade “gap time” – perhaps I can convince our staff at the Department to find a way of incorporating it into the show!

Madame Speaker, there will be a limited number of tickets available to view the show in person, but it will be broadcast live to the general public and recorded for viewing later. And as a way of acknowledging the extraordinary hard work and commitment of our frontline essential workers over the past year, the in-person tickets will be reserved for Bermuda’s immunized workforce who put their lives on the line during the roughest part of the pandemic: healthcare workers, the Police, Bermuda Regiment soldiers, grocery store workers, gas station attendants, as well as other frontline workers who have consistently carried out the labour necessary for our country to stay operational. This is a small gesture that we can offer as a “thank you” for their dedication and their Bermudian resilience.

Madam President, the Department of Culture is also planning to establish a new annual tradition to take place at the beginning of Heritage Month: a conference for Bermuda’s creatives, heritage organisations, artists and cultural groups – this year, to be held in a virtual format.

This will provide an opportunity not only to formally launch the National Cultural Heritage Policy for Bermuda – a throne speech initiative that I will speak to in a subsequent Ministerial Statement – but it will also afford Bermuda’s cultural community the chance to interact and brainstorm ideas around heritage preservation, creative development, challenges and opportunities posed by the pandemic, and to consider how best to support our artistic community.

Particularly as a result of the current set of challenges that face us as a country, there is much work to be done to ensure the viability and sustainability of Bermuda’s creatives and heritage institutions. The staff at the Department of Culture is excited to play a role in that process, and Heritage Month is an ideal time to focus on these kinds of conversations.

Madam President, in addition to some of the programmes that will be hosted by the Department during Heritage Month including a continuation of our popular Creatives Live! Concert series on the steps of City Hall, we anticipate supporting, through grants and partnerships, other organisations and small businesses that wish to host Covid-safe events in May in celebration of our culture and heritage.

Madam President, it has been a difficult year for all. But in the lead-up to the month where we make the time to remember what it means to be Bermudian, I would encourage us all to embrace our Bermudian resilience and to take heart knowing that we will see our way through these tough times. We will emerge with an even clearer sense of who we are as a people and what’s most important to us as Resilient Bermudians. As always Madam President, our community has been in the past, and still remains, the essential ingredient.

Thank you, Madam President.

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Comments (15)

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  1. Unbelievable says:

    Come on, you non-believers! Take this thing seriously please! We’ve lost one year of our Bermudian traditions and losing a second year because some of us refuse to believe the science is ridiculous. The world doesn’t revolve around just you. It revolves around all of us.

    • Dejavu says:

      Zero deaths and zero in hospital…can’t possibly be that deadly can it

      • Kai says:

        Exactly

      • Unbelievable says:

        Zero deaths?? Don’t be a clown. Are you that much in the conspiracy theory tank that you refuse to believe there haven’t been any Covid deaths?

        You too need to redo your science, history and civics lessons becuz clearly you skipped those classes.

      • LOL (original) says:

        Can’t talk to these people they are scared and brainwashed through their fear.

        LOL soon they’ll be calling for the deaths of those that don’t think like them at the extreme or the dehumanization of them. Although I think on this site alone we seen the embers of that sentiment.

  2. Joe Bloggs says:

    We have gone from less than 20 active cases to 150 active cases in a week or so.

    We do not need another “super spreader” event right now.

    • trufth says:

      Maybe we do, actually. Hear me out – we may never reach herd immunity through vaccinations because many people don’t want the vaccine. And right now, people who are infected are recovering just fine, some wouldn’t have even known they had it unless they tested for it. So it’s not a terribly, horrible, awful thing if we reach herd immunity via actual cases of covid??? Just a thought. I know many people who would rather get covid than the immunization. Fact.

      Do people who have already had covid need to get the shot? We have no idea how long the antibodies last via the shot, nor do we necessarily know how long they last via natural immunity after contracting covid.

    • @ Joe Bloggs, That’s Why we need to make sure that this Government pull’s the plug on the boating event with these pleasure crafts from America’s Cup, that is to take place next month.

      • Toodle-oo says:

        They didn’t pull the plug on the golf event last year though , did they ?
        Do you think they should have ?
        (plus this event is worth way more than that and the rugby put together x’s 10 )

  3. Kai says:

    They have stopped the world for a flu. The reason for lockdown, quarantine etc was because it is very deadly— that’s what they told us in the beginning.
    Meanwhile hospitals have never been locked down airports neither.

    They are gonna keep taking freedoms in the name of regulations. Y’all better wake up.

    Whether or not your for the vaccine freedom is freedom. Chances are if you took the vaccination it’s to protect and make you safe so why are y’all so bothered by the ones that don’t. After all you’re safe now right?

    And Humans are supposed to be the smartest species on earth, naaaa the most fearful, media driven, brainwashed followers that only believe what David said (he takes orders he doesn’t run Bermuda)

    Stay woke!!

  4. In all honesty and sincerity I can understand how the Government can come to the conclusion of not having a May 24th parade again this year, “BUT” what I am not understanding is how they can pull the plug on May 24th “BUT” Allow America’s Cup with a Twist Event, Still take place next month and setting up the America’s Cup with a Twist Village to accommodate the overseas event.

    So where is the logic in all of this. This Boating event will have both participants and spectator’s. Bermuda Government needs to pull the plug on all events until further notice, if not let those that want to have events have them, can’t be selective.

    • Dread says:

      You just need to STFU!!!

    • Dread says:

      You just need to STFU!!

    • Unbelievable says:

      I’m willing to bet (and I’m very confident I’d win that bet) that the SailGP event will be FAR safer of an event than any BDA Day Parade is. I’ve been very close to the organization of the BDA Day Parade for many years and I can assure you that every year people break the rules set by the organizers because of alcohol and just plain old entitlement – participants AND spectators.
      You just don’t like this “boating event” because it has nothing to do with you.

  5. Unbelievable says:

    The selfishness in regards to “personal freedoms” and ignorance to science that is prevalent in Bermuda will be the catalyst for its downfall.

    So, so tragic.

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