Photos: 31 Abandoned Boats To Be Removed

July 20, 2022 | 8 Comments

31 abandoned and derelict boats –  located in areas including Mullet Bay, Ferry Reach, Coney Island, Stovell Bay and more –  will be “removed and discarded,” the Government has advised.

These 31 boats are addition to the notices earlier this year about 54 abandoned vessels, with the Government having previously issued two notices of boats set to be removed, with the first notice detailing 37 boats, and the second notice listing 17 boats, and some of those boats from the first two notices have been removed

A quick look at two boats, from the previous notices, being removed:

|

Earlier this month a Ministry of Transport spokesperson said, “The joint programme to remove the vessels is a partnership between Government and Keep Bermuda Beautiful [KBB] following a Memorandum of Understanding [MOU] signed by the Minister of Transport.

“The additional 31 abandoned and derelict are unsightly and present a hazard to other motoring vessels. The vessels are located in the Mullet bay entrance, Ferry Reach, Coney Island and Ducks Puddle [St George’s], Mills Creek and Stovell Bay, Spanish Point [Pembroke] and Somerset areas.

Collage made from some of the images contained in the notice, which you can read in full here

boats notice 31 to be removed (1)

Keep Bermuda Beautiful [KBB] previously noted that they have actually “identified more than 100 abandoned vessels on moorings, on the seafloor, along coastlines and in our bays.”

“Abandoned boats and marine wrecks have been a blight on Bermuda’s beautiful coastline for years. Not only are they a danger to boaters and swimmers, but they are also an environmental hazard leaking fuel and oil into our pristine waters,” KBB said.

“KBB has received funding from two anonymous donors and the Argo Group that will cover the removal, remediation and safe disposal of the wrecks and their hazardous contents including fuel, oil and batteries.”

The images below were extracted from a document [PDF] provided by the Government:

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (1)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (2)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (3)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (4)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (5)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (6)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (7)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (8)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (9)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (10)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (11)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (12)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (13)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (14)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (15)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (16)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (17)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (18)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (19)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (20)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (21)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (22)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (23)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (24)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (25)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (26)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (27)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (28)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (29)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (30)

Abandoned Boat Bermuda July 2022 (31)

Read More About

Category: All, Marine, News, Photos

Comments (8)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Joe Bloggs says:

    Government should pass a law allowing people to take an abandoned boat and register it as their own. Obviously, notice would have to be given, but I am willing to bet good money that there are a lot of people out there who would gladly “rescue” a boat and fix it up if they could keep it or sell it for a profit.

    • Kay says:

      I was wondering if any of them were salvageable, like the sailboat. Hopefully some forethought has been given to how best to deal with them outside of just dumping them.

      • Joe Bloggs says:

        Bermudians used to be quite good at using everything and wasting nothing.

        At some point (during my lifetime) most of us have lost that ethic.

  2. Triangle Drifter says:

    It should be very simple. All boats required to carry liability insurance, including wreck removal.

    No insurance, no registration. No registration, serious penalty for having an uninsured & unregistered boat in the water.

    • puzzled says:

      Drifter you definately live in the Triangle; somewhere if you believe that.

      • Triangle Drifter says:

        One can only hope. Logic & action don’t go well with this Government. A shame really since M&P used to be one of the few effectively run departments.

        These days it is now better than the rest.

  3. Observer says:

    Whilst I applaud the effort being used to remove a bunch of derelict boats, I have to say that there are more aesthetic situations requiring immediate attention. Come on government fix the roads and the edges it’s more important.

    • Joe Bloggs says:

      Actually, “fixing” the roads and creating a second-hand car market is a large part of what created the current road chaos we have. I am fine with clearing the hazards to marine navigation

Leave a Reply