Minister: Public Service Bursary Award Scheme

July 20, 2018 | 5 Comments

Minister of Government Reform Lovitta Foggo highlighted the Public Service Bursary Award Scheme in the House of Assembly today [July 20], explaining that it is “aimed at supporting the educational goals of individuals who one day will occupy ‘hard to fill’ roles within the public service.”

The Minister said, “The Public Service Bursary Award Scheme awards up to 14 scholarships annually to Bermudians pursuing post-secondary academic qualifications in a discipline, which has been identified by Government Departments that meet our future needs. This ensures a well-trained cadre of people to fill positions within the Public Service. The bursaries are valued at $10,000 per year.

“This year, 10 individuals will receive Bursary Awards. Four are new recipients and the remaining are current bursary students who have been approved for continued funding subject to receipt of satisfactory transcripts.

“The new awardees are Destynie Mallory, Shuntelle Paynter, Jodi Ming and Kobe Richardson. They are studying in the fields of Forensic Psychology, Clinical Mental Health Counseling, Real Estate, and Building & Construction Management, respectively. The sponsoring departments for these students are the Departments of Court Services, Land Valuation, and Public Lands and Buildings.

“The continuing bursary students are Doreen Burgess who is studying Environmental Health, Andesha Busby studying Real Estate, Tabia Butterfield who is pursuing studies in Engineering, Tenneil Ratteray studying Physiotherapy, Malik Richards who is studying Geography, and Desiree´ Waldron who is pursuing qualifications in Nursing. The departments sponsoring these students are Departments of Health, Land Valuation, and Planning and the Ministry of Public Works.”

The Minister’s full statement follows below:

Good morning Mr. Speaker,

I rise this morning to highlight the Public Service Bursary Award Scheme and this Government’s commitment to support the development of young Bermudians with a view to preparing them to fill essential technical and professional posts within the public service.

Mr. Speaker, occupations in public service encompass a wide range of fields and provide a great deal of personal and professional satisfaction. The technical and professional areas offer intellectually demanding career options which can be very challenging.

There are many occupation groups in the Bermuda Government requiring varying levels of education and training. Some of these areas are deemed hard to fill, meaning that there is a known limited talent pool with expertise in the specific area available on-Island and in some cases there could exist a global shortage of trained resources.

Mr. Speaker, through the years, the Public Service Bursary Awards Scheme has supported young Bermudians studying in the fields of land valuation, physiotherapy, aquarist, electrical engineering, environmental science, speech and language, horticultural science, law, computer information systems, mathematics, statistics, economics, nursing, criminology, chemistry, history, structural engineering, environment, chemical engineering, aviation management with flight, aviation maintenance, accounting, civil engineering, finance, architecture, surveying and mapping, biology and public administration just to name a few.

In accordance with the requirements of the bursary scheme, many of these former students have taken up posts within the public service upon completion of their studies and become invaluable resources to the people of Bermuda.

Mr. Speaker, Honourable members will know that whilst elected officials are often the most visible figures within Government, the majority of the functions are carried out by highly trained and skilled technical officers.

Mr. Speaker, one of the aims of this Government is to change the perception of careers in the Public Service. Our goal is to align the workforce with our vision. The Government is looking for fresh ideas and innovative viewpoints. We are seeking to become the employer of choice.

Mr. Speaker, our aim is to attract, develop, motivate, and retain a quality talent pool that is committed to the highest standards of excellence.

The Public Service Bursary Award Scheme awards up to 14 scholarships annually to Bermudians pursuing post-secondary academic qualifications in a discipline, which has been identified by Government Departments that meet our future needs. This ensures a well-trained cadre of people to fill positions within the Public Service. The bursaries are valued at $10,000 per year.

Mr. Speaker, the Bursary Award Scheme is aimed at supporting the educational goals of individuals who one day will occupy “hard to fill” roles within the public service. As indicated, we consider posts “hard-to-fill” either due to the lack of available qualified Bermudians or in some cases due to a worldwide shortage of qualified resources.

This year Mr. Speaker, 10 individuals will receive Bursary Awards. Four are new recipients and the remaining are current bursary students who have been approved for continued funding subject to receipt of satisfactory transcripts. The new awardees are Destynie Mallory, Shuntelle Paynter, Jodi Ming and Kobe Richardson. They are studying in the fields of Forensic Psychology, Clinical Mental Health Counseling, Real Estate, and Building & Construction Management, respectively. The sponsoring departments for these students are the Departments of Court Services, Land Valuation, and Public Lands and Buildings.

The continuing bursary students are Doreen Burgess who is studying Environmental Health, Andesha Busby studying Real Estate, Tabia Butterfield who is pursuing studies in Engineering, Tenneil Ratteray studying Physiotherapy, Malik Richards who is studying Geography, and Desiree´ Waldron who is pursuing qualifications in Nursing. The departments sponsoring these students are Departments of Health, Land Valuation, and Planning and the Ministry of Public Works.

Mr. Speaker, I should note that to be considered for a Bursary Award, applicants must:

  • Be Bermudian;
  • Have completed no less than 5 years of schooling in Bermuda;
  • Be 40 years or under at date of application;
  • Have been accepted into an institution of higher learning or currently undertaking courses leading to a professional, specialist or technical qualification required within the Public Service; and/or
  • Be in an Undergraduate or Master’s Degree Programme; and
  • Be planning a career in the Public Service upon completion of their education.

Mr. Speaker, this Government will continue to dedicate our budgetary and career development resources to the Public Service Bursary Award programme. It is an initiative that has produced incredible Bermudian talent who have enjoyed rewarding careers in public service. Mr. Speaker, in the coming weeks and months we will endeavor to commence an initiative that showcases highly skilled and talented public officers and highlights the vast array of occupations in the public service.

In closing Mr. Speaker, I wish to take this opportunity to congratulate this year’s Public Service Bursary Award recipients and wish them well in their future endeavors.

Thank you Mr. Speaker.

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Comments (5)

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  1. Double S says:

    Between this the Barbara Ball Scholarships, the Ministry of Education scholarships, the PLP couldn’t find at least one minority worthy of such awards.

    Diversity for thee, but not for me says the PLP.

    And before anyone responds lets not forget your ‘outrage’ when one more than one token minority was granted scholarships a few years back.

  2. Thank you, abundantly, Minister Foggo.
    The former government did not even care about born Bermudians’ furthering of their education.
    Thank God above for their swift departure July 18, 2017.
    Continue on with the fantastic work of THIS government….simply putting Bermudians first.
    By the way, the comment from Jean Atherden was sheer jealousy. Oba are very, very, very, sore losers.Put Trevor Moniz at the very top of that list!

    • Paz says:

      The term “born Bermudian” should be relegated to the scrap heap like other terms that discriminate against the people of a country. There should be no difference in Bermuda society that is based on where a person is born.

      Any attempt to divide the country through crude populism and identify politics should be harshly condemned by the governement in power. Sadly, the current governement does not do so. They have the power to change Bermuda society but unless they can act courageously as a national government for all Bermudians they will fail.

  3. Yes Eye says:

    Ms. Foggo. Why is it that the scholarships, bursaries and awards given out by this administration are only awarded to certain races? Based on Premier Burt’s (fairer Bermuda) speech these awardees should be a reflection of the people of this country. How is it that time and time again we see these awards only being distributed to members of one race.

    Don’t ask me to pay taxes, duty and everything else and know that my children and grandchildren will be overlooked.

    For those of you that think I am exaggerating or overreacting just search scholarships.. and look at all the photo opps.

    • Double S says:

      “Ms. Foggo. Why is it that the scholarships, bursaries and awards given out by this administration are only awarded to certain races?”

      That must be a rhetorical question. We all know why. The more things change.

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