Photos: BIOS 110th Anniversary Gala Celebration

November 13, 2012 | 13 Comments

The Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences [BIOS] held its Gala Celebration on Friday [Nov 9] at the Fairmont Hamilton Princess hotel, with the occasion serving to formally welcome Bill Curry as President and Director to the community and to celebrate BIOS’s 110th anniversary.

The black-tie celebration, which both Premier Paula Cox and Opposition Leader Craig Cannonier attended, was hosted by Mr. Brian Duperreault, Chairman, and the Board of Trustees of BIOS.

Mr. Duperreault remarked that, “We’re simultaneously welcoming Bill Curry– an internationally-recognized scientist–as our new leader and celebrating 110 years of excellence in ocean science research and education. BIOS stands at an exciting new threshold and I’m gratified to see so many friends in Bermuda affirm their interest and support.”

The evening’s highlight was guest speaker, Dr. Sylvia Earle, a National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence and visionary leader in marine exploration. A longtime friend and supporter of BIOS, Dr. Earle commented on the history and importance of science-based local andregional conservation initiatives [including Bermuda Blue Halo and the Sargasso Sea Alliance] and her hopes for the future of ocean research and protection.

Photos by Akari, click to enlarge:

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  1. Video: BIOS Celebrates 110 Years Of Existence | Bernews.com | November 18, 2012
  1. 1 For the Road says:

    Glad Phil made the quota of 1

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    • Claudio says:

      How many people that look like Phil that you know are heavily interested and invested in Ocean Sciences?

      Think before you make assinine comments.

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    • Observer says:

      Did you even READ the article or did you just scan through for faces just so you could make that stupid comment?

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    • Legal Reasons? says:

      "which both Premier Paula Cox and Opposition Leader Craig Cannonier attended"

      @1 For the Road,
      reading is not your forte, is it?

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    • akari says:

      It might be worth noting that not of those that attended (some 300?) were captured - and only a handful of the photographs that were taken are actually on display here.

      e.g.

      Cannonier:
      http://sphotos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/483129_248481361944636_141213590_n.jpg

      Cox:
      http://sphotos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/311315_248481195277986_1498128253_n.jpg

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  2. Mario says:

    Actually and sadly the photos are a true reflection of the diversity (OR LACK THEREOF) at this institution. There are many people of colour who are interested in ocean sciences but became very discouraged at the closed,gated and well-guarded community at Biostation. These guys are taking full advantage of the location, and duty exemptions.

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    • Zombie Apocalypse says:

      "Actually and sadly the photos are a true reflection of the diversity (OR LACK THEREOF) at this institution".

      Are you talking about the PLP Annual Dinner last weekend?

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    • mariosayswhat?! says:

      closed? gated? and well-guarded? i've been down there a few times for free wednesday tours and never seen any such thing. its actually pretty open, inviting, and welcoming. there is also a diverse community employed there. open your eyes, knucklehead.

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    • Come Correct says:

      I think you missed the turning buddy, its the one with the sign that says BIOS, not the green place with all the prison officers.

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  3. Axxperts.... says:

    Dr. Earle made an excellent speech including references to the commercial opportunities for Bermuda with respect to ocean sciences, unfortunately Premier Cox had dozed off during that part of the speech.

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  4. pwndwg says:

    Amazing how many people give the Biostation a hard time. We should be so proud of that place and what it has down for BDA and the world over 110 years. It seems to me that most of the Bermudian scientists leave very quickly simply because they can get paid twice as much in the BDA Govt and not have the pressure of having to publish peer reviewed papers or compete for grant money. I know lots of people who have worked there and it is one of the most progressive and inclusive places in Bermuda. It is also one of the largest employers in St. Davids and St. Georges. The Biostation educates almost every Bermudian child about science and our environment in high powered programs that make others look like play school. they even teach our teachers how to teach science. They also monitor Belco, the dumps, incinerator, sewage outfalls, reefs, sea grass, mangroves. And I have it on good authority that the Govt pays for a fraction of the cost!

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    • smyles says:

      They pay their white expats more, provide them with very low rent housing. They are treated far better than ANY Bermudian. Bermudians would stay if they were treated any where near as well as some of their (white) upper management.

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