Video: 2014 Premier’s Cup Match Message

July 29, 2014

“This is an exciting time of year and the uniqueness of our Bermudian culture is wonderful to witness and is exemplified in the scene here at Somerset Cricket Club,” said Premier Michael Dunkley this evening [July 29]

“The celebrations we call Cup Match have important historical significance. In one weekend we mark two critical chapters in our Island story. Somers Day remembers our accidental settlement by British sailors bound for the American colonies, while Emancipation Day recalls the end of slavery in the British Empire.

Premier Michael Dunkley’s Cup Match message

“This is a true Bermuda story as it speaks to our ability to celebrate our diverse backgrounds and history, respect our individual traditions and emerge united, determined to celebrate our common bonds and not exploit our differences.

“In the midst of all that Cup Match has become it is important that we never lose sight of just how critical these two events have been to our history and our development. Our British heritage is preserved in our constitutional arrangements and especially in the cricket that forms the central focus of this holiday weekend.

“The struggle for the dignity of all people that was the promise of Emancipation is a principle that can still guide us today. The monuments to that struggle, like the designation of Mary Prince as a national hero and the unbowed representation of Sally Basset in the grounds of the Cabinet Office, still speak to us of the significance of freedom for all people.”

The Premier’s full Cup Match message follows below:

Good evening and thank you for the opportunity to share my thoughts with you as you go about your Cup Match preparations.

This is an exciting time of year and the uniqueness of our Bermudian culture is wonderful to witness and is exemplified in the scene here at Somerset Cricket Club.

The celebrations we call Cup Match have important historical significance. In one weekend we mark two critical chapters in our Island story. Somers Day remembers our accidental settlement by British sailors bound for the American colonies, while Emancipation Day recalls the end of slavery in the British Empire. This is a true Bermuda story as it speaks to our ability to celebrate our diverse backgrounds and history, respect our individual traditions and emerge united, determined to celebrate our common bonds and not exploit our differences.

In the midst of all that Cup Match has become it is important that we never lose sight of just how critical these two events have been to our history and our development. Our British heritage is preserved in our constitutional arrangements and especially in the cricket that forms the central focus of this holiday weekend.
The struggle for the dignity of all people that was the promise of Emancipation is a principle that can still guide us today. The monuments to that struggle, like the designation of Mary Prince as a national hero and the unbowed representation of Sally Basset in the grounds of the Cabinet Office, still speak to us of the significance of freedom for all people.

Bermuda today continues to emerge from an economic storm that has affected us for a sustained period. Recovery is slow and relief sometimes seems far off. Our celebrations this year also take place against the backdrop of recent tragedies on our roads. With so much facing us as a people the lesson of our history is that solutions lie in unity.

Like many of you, I have supported The Family Centre’s annual fundraising campaign in partnership with Clarien Bank and proudly wear the team’s colours of ribbons they have provided. The Campaign’s message this year features two beautiful little girls each supporting a different Cup Match Team. But the all-important tag line is “…but they are best friends…”

That is the true spirit of Bermuda. That is who we have always been: Fierce rivals on the field of play in whatever arena, but stronger in unity than in division. As we celebrate this Cup Match, my hope is that we can carry the spirit in which we celebrate this holiday and the Cup Match Classic beyond this long weekend. We can and should inject it into how we deal with each other. I believe that we all want what is best for Bermuda. Our disagreements mean that we have different views on how to achieve that.
One friend of mine is a staunch St. George’s supporter and when I asked him what he thought might happen in this year’s game, his reply was: “I don’t even care who wins, as long as we get a result; that’s always good for the game…”

Although he was talking about cricket, that is what we should want for Bermuda: Results that are good for all of us.

As the excitement builds towards Thursday and Friday I encourage everyone to enjoy this holiday to the fullest but to do so safely. If you drink, do not drive. Take care of your children as they enjoy the beach or swimming off the rocks. Enjoy camping, fellowship with family and friends but above all, support your team and proudly wear your colours.

Let’s all enjoy Cup Match time in Bermuda.

Thank you.

-

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  1. 2014 Cup Match Photos, Videos, Links & More | Bernews.com | August 4, 2014
  1. js says:

    wow there really are two Bermudas

    In all my 40 years this is the first time I have ever heard of the name Somers Day and what it celebrates

    I can only surmise that that’s the basis for the Non-Mariners Race which I only realized was an annual event 10 years ago

    • Build a Better Bermuda says:

      This a remembrance for 2 significant points in our history, and many keep talking about there being 2 Bermudas, but in reality there are many Bermudas and we all share the same history. As for the non-mariners, it is more of a reminder for us to not take ourselves to seriously. But for the next couple days there really are only 2 Bermudas, Somerset and St. George’s… but go Somerset, do us proud again.

      • The real says:

        You mean its a reminder not to take emancipation seriously

        • Build a Better Bermuda says:

          Sad reflection on yourself if that is how you feel.

        • hmmm says:

          @The real, So you don’t take emancipation seriously????

          WOW. I’m ashamed of you

      • The real says:

        Why couldn’t we recognize these two separate events separately? It’s called watering down black traditions. Truth is business never supported this holiday but now it pimps it.

        • hmmm says:

          Well you can beat up on your PLP as it has always been these two days. They thought it was all good.

        • brigadooner says:

          Love it. Bernews commentators have the uncanny ability to make absolutely everything about race. I used to be upset now I’m just impressed.

    • All on board says:

      He was supposed to lead the OBA team but they are getting bowled out for ducks. It is going to be hot after Cup Match and lots of catches in the slips.

    • Why? says:

      These are tough economic times and we must find creative ways to save money. So I want labour to sacrifice so I can have enough money to do the broadcast.
      Makes sense to me.

  2. High road says:

    Thanks Premier Dunkley. Keep up the good work.

    • I see we have more than the interest of Bermudas future in common; I see we both also support Somerset (all de way! :-) ) Happy holidays Premier Michael Dunkley and everyone else here on the Islands of Bermuda.

  3. Evie says:

    Ah when did you say slavery endend hahahahaha there are no whips and chains but the struggle continues waste of effing film

    • Barracuda says:

      slave to your own mind .

    • Build a Better Bermuda says:

      “We are going to emancipate ourselves from mental slavery because whilst others might free the body, none but ourselves can free the mind. Mind is your only ruler, sovereign. The man who is not able to develop and use his mind is bound to be the slave of the other man who uses his mind….” Marcus Garvey, Nova Scotia, October 1937.

      Anybody that tells you life is anything other than a continuous struggle is either trying to sell you something, or wants your vote.

    • Herb says:

      You and others demean your ancestors struggles when you compare todays conditions to what they had to endure, shame on you who think this way.

  4. lifetime says:

    Get some rest this weekend Dunkley. You look drained.

  5. Robert says:

    I heard that speech, and thought to myself, what a waste of f$%kin film.

  6. Robert says:

    This man is as phony as a million dollar bill !!!

    • Hmmm says:

      why you speaking about yourself again Robert!

  7. Somerset Girl says:

    Do any of you above really know and understand the history of our CupMatch and Non Mariners. I am so tired of listening and reading opinions from people who don’t have a clue. If you truly understood you would feel empowered not suppressed. You would be able to draw strength from the hardships our ancestors endured AND Survived. Come on people suck it up. Stand strong, stop whining and complaining, take hold of your destiny stop giving it back to the dead oppressors! Grown Up!

    • Robert says:

      Please, tell us the true meaning behind the non mariners race, I’ve always been told one the, but obviously it was wrong, so please enlighten us .l

      • Big D says:

        Robert … You are always a cloud on a sunny day… Chillax

      • Build a Better Bermuda says:

        As I believe I’ve been told, it involved alcohol, I think it was a pram and a bet that an adult couldn’t use it as a boat, perhaps if the non-commodore is out there, he could chime in and provide us with the non-history.
        What I get out of it is that we really should take ourselves too seriously in the end.

      • Triangle Drifter says:

        As I understand it the Non Mariners Race started in, of all places, The Mariners Club located where the Butterfield Bank Serpentine Rd carpark is today.

        Alcohol was probably involved & the result, along with other things, was a PTB bus floating down Hamilton Harbour.

        Today is a far cry from the days of some pretty big contraptions where the aim was to really finish. Today it is a small demo derby & a gigantic floating party where very few actually see any floats.

  8. Keven says:

    Not sure all da sunlight would help ya. May be if you sat on it. Heee

  9. The real says:

    Funny how the premier refers to Somers day first. What are we celebrating again?

    • Herb says:

      which day do you think came first in our history.

    • brigadooner says:

      He was saying the milestones in chronological order. Relax.

  10. Robert says:

    Emancipation day is celebrated the first day of cup match, somers day is second, but obviously somers day seems to be of greater significance to your premier.

    • END TALK OF RACE! says:

      Robert, clearly Somers day is more important than Emancipation day, because without Sir George Somers, WE WOULD NOT BE HERE OR HAVE AN ISLAND, DUUUUUH!!!!!!!!!!!

      Duhhhhhhhh
      Duhhhhhhhh
      Duhhhhhhhhh

    • hmmm says:

      I don’t see how you came to that conclusion. It’s all in your mind Robert.

    • Triangle Drifter says:

      Poor Robert. I’ll bet he will spend the weekend with Alvin sitting in front of a computer sipping a sweet green beverage laced with plenty of bitters.

  11. JUNK YARD DOG says:

    If you live in the past you will never discover the future!

  12. Benedict Greening says:

    It seems some people would only be satisfied if the Premier didn’t mention Somers Day at all. Well it is part of Bermuda’s history and means a lot to a lot of people and so get used to it. Dunkley was right and I’m glad he mentioned both it and Emancipation Day, whether it was first or second in his remarks (who cares anyway?)

  13. watching says:

    ok this was a message about pretty much nothing.

  14. Come On Man says:

    Blah Blah Blah!!

  15. Square leg left over says:

    Lets hope that previous displays of less than sportsmanlike behavious are not repeated this year when a call by the umpire doesnt go someone way…..